Category Archives: Around Lake Washington

Client Appreciation Event!

Please join me for my client appreciation event on Saturday May 20th, 2017!

Who: YOU! That’s who!

What: Client Appreciation- Bring your old electronics and any documents you would like to have securely shredded! Dante’s Hot Dogs will be provided, and free parking is available! Stop by and say HI!

When: Saturday May 20th, 2017 10:00AM- 1:00PM

Where: 1200 Westlake Avenue North, Seattle WA 98109 Parking Validated in the lower paid lot!

Why: Because I love my clients!

 

Lake Water Levels to Rise

According to Hiram M. Chittenden Locks: We are raising Lake Washington to the target summer elevation a couple weeks earlier than normal due to extremely low inflows to Lake Washington. The lake is currently at elevation 21.9 feet, which is typical for early May and consistent with normal annual operation. However, given the extreme low water supply situation, we intend to refill to an elevation of 22 feet in the next week or two instead of the June 1 date typically targeted. Vessel owners should closely monitor lake elevations and adjust mooring lines as necessary. Lake Washington’s status is available on the Reservoir Control Center website at http://bit.ly/NWS-RCC.

Show me how you celebrate winter and win prizes!

As the cold months approach, we are all looking for ways to stay warm. This year I have decided to hold a contest in celebration of winter! I am curious how you keep warm during the coldest months of the year. Hashtag your photos on social media: twitter, facebook, instagram with the hashtag #WAYWARMWINTER and on December 19th I will be holding a drawing to give away a winter gift basket!

winter-wonderland-contest

Boating Safety & Education for Summer on the Water

LifeJacketWearIt

Keep everyone safe on the water by following these safety guidelines:

  • Always wear a life jacket.
  • Don’t drink on a boat … or assign a designated driver who is comfortable with the boat and weather conditions.
  • Be weather wise/aware of tides. Pack accordingly & prepare for changing conditions.  Don’t forget the SPF!
  • Bring your cell phone and portable battery charger in a waterproof zip lock bag.
  • Do a walk-around of your boat to assure no trouble spots developed over the winter or since last used.
  • Trade in your old flares for a discount on a new set.
  • Make sure the first aid kit is fully stocked.
  • Allow the blower to run for at least 4 minutes after fueling before turning on the engine. Always travel with a fire extinguisher.

 

Who Needs a Washington Boater Education Card?!

Boaters in Washington need to have their Washington State Boater Education Card with them when operating a boat 15 horsepower or greater. Boater operators born before January 1, 1955 are exempt but may choose to get a card if they plan to boat in Canada or Oregon since both require mandatory education.  Find more information here:  parks.state.wa.us/437/education-information

Providers of online classes can be found here: parks.state.wa.us/448/online-courses.

Need a life jacket for your child?

There are several programs throughout the Puget Sound that will loan you a life jacket.  Look here for locations boatus.org/life-jacket-loaner/usamap.asp

Boat Owners! The state wants YOU to STOP dumping sewage!

Boaters and vessel operators would not be able to release sewage, treated or untreated, into Puget Sound under a proposal by Washington state regulators.

The Department of Ecology said Thursday, July 21 it and other state agencies petitioned the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to designate the waters of Puget Sound a “no discharge zone” to improve water quality and protect shellfish beds and swimming beaches from harmful bacteria.

If approved, the zone would cover waters from near Sequim to south Puget Sound to the Canadian border, and includes Lake Washington and Lake Union. There are dozens of no-discharge zones in the country, but this would be the first in the Pacific Northwest.

Critics say the proposal is too broad and will be costly for many who would have to retrofit their vessels to accommodate holding tanks. They say many vessel operators currently use marine sanitation devices to treat sewage before it’s pumped overboard.

“This designation is an important piece of our strategy, and is a necessary step forward for one of our state’s most prized ecological treasures,” Department of Ecology Director Maia Bellon said in a statement Thursday.

The agency said in its petition that “vessel sewage discharges are small in volume, but have high potential impact due to proximity, often directly over or near shellfish and other protected resources, such as swimming beaches.” It also leaves shellfish beds vulnerable and threatens an important shellfish food supply in Washington, officials said.

The department says it sought the petition after four years of evaluation, outreach and public feedback. The EPA has 90 days to review the petition and make a decision.

If approved, the zone would immediately apply to all vessels, with the exception of tugboats, commercial fishing vessels and some boats that would have five years to retrofit their vessels. There are more than 150,000 recreational and commercial vessels in Puget Sound.

Many boaters currently pump out toilet waste at stationary facilities, hold waste in tanks, or treat the waste before pumping it out. Currently, boaters are allowed to pump out treated sewage anywhere in Puget Sound. Federal law allows vessels to dump raw sewage only in waters more than 3 miles from the coast.

In its petition, state regulators say treated sewage discharges contain fecal bacteria concentrations that are many times higher than the state water quality standards.

A group representing numerous vessel operators, ports and shipyards say they’re concerned The Department of Ecology is moving ahead “without due regard for either the economic or scientific arguments against a Sound-wide NDZ,” the Puget Sound NDZ Marine Alliance wrote to department officials in May.

Chris Wilke with the Puget Soundkeeper Alliance praised the move. “It’s time we looked at all pollution and stop treating Puget sound like our toilet,” he said.

Ecology department officials say most recreational and commercial vessels in Puget Sound with on-board toilets have holding tanks or use pump-out stations, or wait to release sewage more than three miles from shore. They estimate about 215 commercial boats and 2,000 recreational boats would need to add holding tanks.

Retrofits for tug boats and commercial vessels could range from negligible to $161,000, according to a consultant for the department. The cost of adding a holding tank on a recreational boat is estimated to be about $1,500.

The agency said it determined there are sufficient pump-out stations for recreational boaters and commercial vessel operators.